Graphic Communications Lecturer Paul Minott has taken part in recreating a historical bedroom in Bath, showcasing a suite of furniture designed by the world-famous Glasgow- born architect and designer Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

Designed for the family home of Bath-based businessman and engineer Sidney Horstmann, the bedroom suite, which arrived in the city in 1917, will be recreated 100 years later in the Museum of Bath at Work in an exhibition ‘ A Bedroom in Bath: C R Mackintosh and Sidney Horstmann’ that will run from June 15th to October 2017.

The bedroom suite was designed especially for Sidney Horstmann’s home on the Upper Bristol Road in 1917 and featured a unique decorative scheme of painted friezes around the walls, which Paul has reconstructed.

The room will allow the furniture (borrowed from the Victoria and Albert Museum) to be displayed in a scale space with decoration copied from Mackintosh’s original drawings.

Dr Trevor Turpin, chairman of the museum board, who has prepared the exhibition, said:

This is a unique opportunity for people of Bath to see a bedroom designed by Mackintosh for a room in Bath. It may not happen again for another 100 years. With the bedroom suite coming back to Bath a new chapter in the story of Mackintosh has been opened. It is very exciting as the commission from Horstmann is one of the very rare occasions Mackintosh worked in England. This exhibition is all about travelling back in time to see the furniture and the careful attention to detail that is the hallmark of Mackintosh and that has inspired generations of designers and architects.

Pamela Robertson, professor emerita of Mackintosh studies at the University of Glasgow, said:

It will be marvellous to see the Horstmann furniture set against a recreation of the original Mackintosh decorative scheme. This has not been done before, and is all the more resonant for being set up in Bath. The project will greatly add to our understanding of Mackintosh’s post-Glasgow interior designs.

The exhibition will run  15 June – 1 October.